Posts tagged ‘flour’

December 3, 2014

Chive Boxes (韭菜盒子)

by tina

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It’s sure been a while since I’ve blogged–As always, time sure flies.  It’s not that I haven’t been cooking anything new for the past year.  Unfortunately, I just haven’t had the time to document it!  Bad excuse.  But here’s my attempt to start it up again. :) This is my first post of this year… WOOT!

So for the past few months, I had been obsessing over some delicious chive boxes at a nearby restaurant.  They kind of reminded me of the ones my mother used to make, and naturally I wanted to learn to make them myself! I’ve made these a couple of times now and have concluded that this following recipe was closest to the taste of how I remember it to be.  If you have a chance to make it, I hope you will enjoy it too!

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups all purpose flour
  • 2 bundles bean thread/glass noodles
  • 8 cups chives
  • 1/4 cup dried baby shrimp
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1/2 cup low sodium chicken broth
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon fish sauce (or to taste)
  • 1/8 teaspoon white pepper

(yields about 20 chive boxes)

Directions:

Before you start anything else, soak the bean thread in water.

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1) Make the dough.  In a mixing bowl, place the flour in, start adding a little cold water, and mix them together with your hand. Continue the process of adding a little cold water and mixing, and repeat until medium clumps form. Attach the mixing bowl to the mixer and use the hook to help continue the flour mixing process. If you do not have a mixer, no worries, it can still be done with your hands, but it’ll just be more tiring.

For the mixer, add more cold water as needed and mix on low. If using your hand, add cold water as needed and continue kneading the dough. Continue mixing and adding water as needed until all the flour sticks together in a mound. The mound should be not too hard and not too sticky.

Take the dough out of the mixer and continue kneading it with a lil bit of flour.  If you’re already hand kneading it, continue with a lil bit more flour.  Eventually make the dough into a ball.

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Place it in a mixing bowl or bowl and cover it with a wet paper towel.  This will let the dough settle while you prepare the filling.

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2) Make the filling. Take the chives and cut off about 1 inch of the stems. Wash and chop the chives into small pieces.

The bean thread should be softened by now.  Discard the bean thread water and chop the bean thread into small pieces.

Here are all the ingredients pictured for the filling:

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In a medium sized bowl, scramble the eggs with a dash of salt.  With the pan temperature on high, place about 1/2 tablespoon of oil.  When the oil is fairly hot, place the eggs in and pan fry it.  Do not overcook the eggs–once it is no longer runny, try to chop it into smaller pieces in the pan.  Then take it out of the pan and chop into even smaller pieces.

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Wipe off the pan, and turn the temperature back to high.  Put about 1 teaspoon of oil in the pan.  When the oil is hotter, place the dried baby shrimp in, stir.  Place the chopped eggs back in, stir.  Place the chopped bean thread in, stir, and add the chicken broth. Stir for about 30 secs. Turn the temperature off.

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Take the baby shrimp-eggs-bean thread mix and add it to the chives.  Mix thoroughly.

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Add the salt, soy sauce, fish sauce, and white pepper.  Mix thoroughly.

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3) Make the skin.  Now that the dough has had some time to settle, take it out of the bowl and knead very thoroughly with some flour.  Then split them into 5 parts. Place 4 of the mounds back in the bowl and cover it with the same wet paper towel (may require re-wetting). Take the one mound left out and roll it with your hands into a circular long shape, like a sausage.  Cut it into 4 pieces.  Flour the pieces and with the cross section facing up, smash them down with the palm of your hand.  Roll out the smashed pieces to about 2-3 mm thick.

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4) Wrap the chive box.  Place some filling in the skin and fold the skin in half to enclose the filling.

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The skin should meet the other half on all edges, about 1cm from the edge. Pleat to seal the edges. Flour the bottom and set aside.  (I like to thinly coat a cookie sheet and place the finished chive boxes on there for temporary storage).

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Repeat 3) and 4) with each of the mounds.

Since this recipe may yield more chive boxes than needed for a meal, you could freeze them to enjoy later. Just simply place the cookie sheet filled with chive boxes in the freezer. It will take about an hour to freeze and once frozen, transfer to ziplock freezer bags.

5) *Pan fry. Turn temperature to high. Once pan is hot, add 1 1/2 tablespoons of oil.  Place 2 chive boxes, top side down first, in the pan and fry until light brown, about 2 to 3 minutes.  Then flip them to the other side (bottom side) and pan fry it for another 2 to 3 minutes or until light brown.

Ta-da! Enjoy~~

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*For chive boxes from the freezer, you could fry/steam the potstickers. Turn temperature to high. Once pan is hot, add 1 1/2 tablespoons of oil. Place 2 chive boxes, top side down first, in the pan and let it sizzle for 1 minute, or until golden. Flip them to the other side (bottom side) and let it sizzle for 30 seconds.  Add about 1/2 cup water, or just covering half of the chive boxes. Put the pan cover on to the side of the pan to let the air escape a little.  Once the water in the pan fully evaporates, flip them back over to the initial side and fry until crisp and light brown.

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August 19, 2011

My Mini 蛋餅’s (Egg Pancake Rolls)

by tina

So when I made potstickers again, I ended up with a large mound of leftover dough for some reason. (The last time I made potstickers, I had dough leftover as well, but a smaller mound. I didn’t know what to do with it, so it ended up sitting in a ziplock for a couple of days in the fridge and grew mold o_o) 

So this time I definitely wanted to do something with it, but didn’t know what at first. As I rummaged through my fridge, I saw green onions and thought, HEY! I’ll make some green onion pancakes!!! ^____^  I was definitely excited that my dough wasn’t going to go to waste.

(Green onion pancakes, very easy. (I think some people add oil/shortening but I didn’t…) Chop up green onion, stretch the dough out, place the onion in the middle, knead to evenly distribute. Repeat process to add all of the green onion. Add some salt. Continue kneading. Like making the potsticker skins, roll to a circular long shape, cut into segments etc. Roll them into very very thin “skins” (edges do not have to be thinner).  Flour them up real well, stack them, wrap in foil and put them in the freezer where you can store it to cook later).

I wanted to taste test this random creation, so I pan fried one of them up with a little bit of oil. Then I got more creative and decided to make an egg as well (added some salt in before beating) and roll it up with the green onion pancake to make a 蛋餅 (egg pancake roll) that people eat in Taiwan for breakfast. I should’ve added some green onion to the egg, but it was yummy nonetheless.

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July 26, 2011

Potstickers (鍋貼)

by tina

I <3 potstickers!! well, dumplings in general! My late mother used to make these all the time when I was young. They were the best and it’s one of the many things that I loved about her cooking. I am very thankful that my friend’s mother was able teach me how to make them from scratch and in the process, it also refreshed some of my memory of how my mother used to make them.

For this particular recipe, I tried my best to make them like my mother’s style. :) and I can proudly say that it ended up tasting SUPER close. yay.

Even though making these sucked up about 5 hrs of my time, it was well worth it. (if you have an assistant, it’ll probably cut that time down to 2-3hrs)

Ingredients:

dough:

  • 3 1/2-4 cups all purpose flour
  • water (cold and hot)

filling:

  • 1 1/2 lb ground pork
  • 8-10 large shrimps
  • 1 1/2 tablespoon potato starch (太白粉)
  • 3/4-1 cup water
  • 2 tablespoons rice wine
  • 2 tablespoons ginger, very finely minced
  • 1 3/4-2 teaspoons salt (amount dependent on how much shrimps/chives you decide to use)
  • 1 1/2-2 teaspoons soy sauce
  • 3 tablespoons sesame oil
  • 3-4 cups chives, finely chopped (depends on how much you like chives. I love chives, so I use 4 cups, or more..)

dipping sauce:

  • 1 soy sauce : 2-3 vinegar ratio
  • garlic, chopped (however much you like)

(recipe yields about 80 potstickers)

1) Make the dough. In a mixing bowl, place the flour in, start adding a little cold water, and mix them together with your hand. Continue the process of adding a little cold water and mixing, and repeat until medium clumps form. Attach the mixing bowl to the mixer and use the hook to help continue the flour mixing process. If you do not have a mixer, no worries, it can still be done with your hands, but it’ll just be more tiring.

For the mixer, add hot water as needed and mix on low. If using your hand, add hot water as needed and continue kneading the dough. Continue mixing and adding water as needed until all the flour sticks together in a mound. The mound should be not too hard and not too sticky. Leave it in the mixing bowl, cover the mixing bowl with a wet towel, cover that with a lid, and let the dough settle while you prepare the filling.

2) Make the filling. Ground up the ground pork a little more, ground up the shrimp, very finely mince the ginger, and finely chop the chives.

Mix the pork and shrimp in a mixing bowl. Always mix in the same direction (I was always told to do this and apparently it does the trick somehow. it’s supposed to make the meat more tender or something). So if you’re mixing clockwise, keep mixing in that direction. Also, mix on a slant as if you’re beating eggs. Add the water a little at a time and mix well after each addition. After the 3/4-1 cup water is fully added (water addition depends on dryness of mixture), add the potato starch, mix. Add the rice wine, ginger, salt, soy sauce, and sesame oil. Mix many times to evenly distribute the ingredients. Add the chives. Mix. If your arm isn’t sore from mixing, then you’re not mixing hard enough (may not happen to you, but it happened to me. I definitely got an arm workout). Basically, the more you mix, the more tender and yummy your filling will be. I think I mixed this for about 20-30 mins with breaks in between.

3) Make the skin. By now, the flour would have settled and become sticky and softer. Cover your cutting board with a good layer of flour. Take the whole mound onto the cutting board and knead. Add more flour as needed. After you knead it a couple times, separate a small mound from the large mound. Place the large mound back in the mixing bowl and cover (it’s important to keep to dough moist). Take the small mound, cover the cutting board with flour, and knead it very well.

Roll it with your hands into a circular long shape. When the width of it is 1 1/2 inches, cut the dough into 3/4 inch segments (1st picture). Flour the cut pieces and with the cross section facing up, smash them down with the palm of your hand (2nd picture). Roll out the smashed pieces to about 2-3 mm thick (3rd picture). Roll the edges of the skin (about 1/2 inch of the edge) to 1 mm thick. (4th picture). Personally, I like to make my potsticker skins thin, so I try to do the 2 mm and 1 mm edges.

4) Wrap the potsticker. Enclose the filling with the skin by crimping folds, pleating. Once wrapped, flour the bottom nicely (to avoid sticking to plate and pan when frying) and set aside on a plate.

Repeat 3) and 4) with each of the other mounds.

You could freeze the rest of the potstickers to save and enjoy later. Freezing them was a little tricky for me. You’d want to place them flat on a large tray, a cookie sheet will probably be fine (the plate below was a not so good idea). Flour the cookie sheet with a thin layer before putting the potstickers on and then place in freezer.

5) Fry/steam the potstickers. Turn temperature to high. Once pan is hotter, add 1 1/2 tablespoon of oil. Place the potstickers in the pan and let it sizzle for 1 minute. Add 1/2-1 cup water to fry/steam (the water depends on if the potstickers were freshly made or if from freezer). Put the pan cover on. Sometimes, I would also put the cover to the side to let the air escape a little.

Once the water in the pan fully evaporates, the potstickers are done!! Make the sauce and Enjoy~~nom nom nom.

Boiled dumplings can be made with this same recipe, but you can just use cold water when making the dough and when making the dumpling, instead of pleating the skin, you only have to pinch the skin together when you wrap.

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